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Can we see solar eclipse through mobile camera

If you don't get a snapshot of the solar eclipse, can you really say you watched it? I think we all know by now that the millennial generation has zero shame in their selfie game, and while I understand that itching desire to do it for the 'gram, cautionary measures should be taken no matter how you view and capture this Kodak moment. Solar eclipse or not, you don't want to risk exposing the naked eye to sun rays. To avoid risk of irreversible damage for the sake of an Instagram photo, here are a few tips on how to use your smartphone to view and document a total or partial eclipse this afternoon and onwards. If you're lucky enough to reside in any of the 12 states experiencing totality this afternoon, there's a tiny window of opportunity two minutes or so where it will be safe to look directly at the moon blocking the sun. Unfortunately for those not on the nature-made VIP viewers list, the rest of us will only experience a partial eclipse, meaning solar eclipse viewer glasses are necessary if you plan on watching the solar eclipse from your front lawn.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: REAL OR HOAX? Will the solar eclipse damage your smart phone camera

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: 360º Total Solar Eclipse Experience 4K - Indonesia 2016

How to photograph the eclipse with your phone

There was never any doubt about the necessity of this blog post. And in case you didn't know the solar eclipse is set to premiere on Monday, August, 21, - may be a good idea to set your reminder now.

So we turned to our never-fail answer machine, Google, to see if and how we should be using our phone cameras to document this natural wonder. The first issue we encountered was a practical one: will the sun fry our cell phone cameras if we try to photograph the eclipse? You can use these helpful tips to photograph sunsets, sunrises, or even the moon. Did your parents ever scold you for looking directly at the sun? Then start brushing up on your Ray Charles impression. NASA says no.

Go out on an evening and take some photos of the moon. This is a great one, and not so obvious. Manually shut off the flash, focus the camera yourself, and turn down the exposure time for the clearest photo. But, be careful. The telephoto lens might let in enough light to damage your camera, so speak to your merchant about whether it needs a filter to protect it from sunlight. Especially if you go the telephoto lens route, it helps to use a tripod to steady the camera.

Telephoto lenses are particularly sensitive to movement, so it will help with the clarity if your camera is completely stable.

And, even without the lens, it still helps. This video from CNET shows you how to make your own homemade cell phone tripod if you blew all your allowance money on the telephoto lens. Partial Solar Eclipse. Our Puls technicians can repair and replace your front and back camera. And just in time for Monday's solar eclipse - the moment may pass quickly but a picture lasts a lifetime! With the summer coming up, you should start getting your outdoor space ready to enjoy when the warmer weather hits.

Your porch is the perfect place for an easy renovation project. You can make it a great place to relax and enjoy the sunshine and warm weather by utilizing the tips below. Summer's coming, and as a Houston-area resident you know that means it's going to be hot and humid.

While you may be used to the steamy climate, protecting your appliances from the extreme heat and damaging power surges might be more of a challenge than you think.

To keep your most-valuable equipment running smoothly year-round, take a look at these important tips:. Book a Service. Book a service. The Puls Blog Your one-stop-shop for everything home maintenance. All Posts. Read this before photographing the eclipse with your smartphone So we turned to our never-fail answer machine, Google, to see if and how we should be using our phone cameras to document this natural wonder. Will photographing the eclipse fry my cell phone camera?

What can I do to get the best photo of the eclipse with my cell phone camera? Cover the lens with your eclipse glasses. Turn off autofocus. Get a telephoto lens. Use a tripod. Try video mode. Having camera issues? Jake S.

Jake Sherman is a professional writer with a background in journalism. He is fascinated by home appliances and how they work. He enjoys breaking down complex topics and explaining them in interesting ways. He has been a Puls staff writer for two years. When he's not writing, he enjoys trotting around the globe, trying unfamiliar foods, and testing unmarked doors to see if they're locked.

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Can You Photograph the Solar Eclipse with Your Phone or Tablet?

It takes some skill and some extra equipment to take dramatic pictures of a solar eclipse. But it is possible to capture the mood even with a simple cell phone camera. Never look directly at the Sun without proper eye protection.

For about three minutes on August 21, if you're lucky, you can watch the moon cross in front of the sun and block out its light in a total solar eclipse. Afterward, you can expect your Instagram feed to fill with pictures of the big event.

The total solar eclipse of is upon us, and many people are asking: Can I photograph the phenomenon with my cellphone or tablet? With a few caveats, the answer is "yes. Today Aug. You can watch a livestream of the eclipse on the Space.

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As you may have heard, a total solar eclipse is making its way across the continental US on Monday. You need to wear protective solar-eclipse glasses to safely watch the moon cross in front of the sun, as the sun's powerful rays can cause serious eye damage if viewed directly. There are several good ways to watch the event without staring at the sun if you haven't been able to find glasses. But one method of trying to watch without directly looking should be avoided, according to Dr. Don't try to watch the eclipse through the front-facing selfie camera on your phone, Tezel said in a news release. You can take photos of the eclipse with your phone camera without damaging the sensor, as long as you don't have a zoom lens attached — there's no danger to the camera itself. But your phone screen can reflect ultraviolet light back into your eye, according to Tezel, potentially causing the same damage — solar retinopathy — as looking at the sun itself. Even taking a selfie without wearing eclipse glasses could reflect the sun's light back into your eyes. According to NASA , symptoms of sun damage usually include blurred vision, seeing dark or yellow spots, pain, or losing vision in the center of the eye. That can make it hard or impossible to read or to focus on whatever is in the center of your view.

Will the solar eclipse destroy my smartphone or digital camera?

Attempting to photograph the solar eclipse on Monday, August 21, probably won't damage your smartphone camera, but it could, according to NASA. The space agency's guide to photographing the eclipse notes that lenses on smartphone cameras are "generally very small about 2 millimeters and do not admit enough light" to damage the camera. In addition, smartphone cameras "come equipped with UV filters that cut down on some of the visible light landing on the sensor chip," and "they automatically set their exposures for very short times. NASA points out, "Nearly every photographer that comments on this issue says it is OK if you do it very briefly such as when you are taking a scenery photo and the sun is in the picture.

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There was never any doubt about the necessity of this blog post. And in case you didn't know the solar eclipse is set to premiere on Monday, August, 21, - may be a good idea to set your reminder now. So we turned to our never-fail answer machine, Google, to see if and how we should be using our phone cameras to document this natural wonder.

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For those of us who waited too long to snag a pair of safe, legit solar-viewing glasses , using a phone as an intermediary to view the eclipse sounds like a clever, accessible hack. If you point your phone at the full, bright sun, it will immediately respond by darkening the entire view, just as your eyes are averse to staring directly at the sun. But the dimming of the sun during a partial eclipse can confuse your phone, too, and cause your phone screen to burn too brightly where there is a sliver of sun. This can cause damage to your phone, including the burning out of pixels on your screen.

SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Solar Eclipse Photography with a SMARTPHONE!

Unless you've been living under a rock, you undoubtedly know about the total solar eclipse moving across the US on Monday, August Of course, where you live or plan on traveling to will impact just how much of the eclipse you can see, but nonetheless, even if you can only see a small portion of it, you surely want to take photos. And since our phones are often our camera as well, here are some tips to take the best eclipse photos you can use with an iPhone or Android device. It should go without saying, but I'd be remiss if I didn't mention it: If you're going to look directly at the sun during the eclipse, you need to wear protective glasses. Not doing so can cause permanent damage to your eyes, and nobody wants that. Putting those same glasses on your phone is also recommended.

How To Photograph The Solar Eclipse On Your iPhone or iPad with NightCap

Eclipses are rare, and total eclipses are often a once in a lifetime experience. Our guide will show you how to set up NightCap Camera on your iPhone or iPad to take a sequence of photos automatically, so you can focus on watching the eclipse and not the screen. The screenshots with these instructions show the iPhone interface, but will work exactly the same for the iPad too. Images kindly provided by Jim Opalek, using NightCap and a solarscope during the American total eclipse of Also, the lens gives quite a wide view which means the sun will be quite small in your photos. Protect the camera lens with a solar filter. You can start a fire with a magnifying glass.

Most of the 'beauty shots' you will see related to this eclipse will be taken with professional digital cameras on tripods, or shot through a telescope, but the most.

W hen the total solar eclipse occurs on Aug. In a shift from 38 years ago, many of the sky watchers this month will want to photograph the solar eclipse on their phone. Still, there are ways to work around those difficulties, says Symes, who has been photographing the sun, moon and planets with his iPhone since Here are three of his suggestions for how to photograph the solar eclipse with your phone:. Those planning to view the solar eclipse through a telescope can also use it as a tool for capturing more vivid photos of the eclipse.

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