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Should you look at the cue ball or object ball

Almira asked: Hey! I'm from Turkey! I was wondering how can I make snooker more popular and noticeable in Turkey? We don't have any events or competitions here, but, even so, I'm really trying to make it popular. MS: It's difficult to organise a tournament anywhere, let alone in a country where most of the people have never heard of snooker. One thing that could be done which might give the sport a boost is to try and find one or two professionals who would be willing to come over for an exhibition match.

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SEE VIDEO BY TOPIC: Where To Look When Playing Pool - Pool School

Mark Selby answers your questions

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. What should we be doing with our eyes as we shoot? The generally accepted wisdom here is that we should be looking at the object ball or rail target as we strike the CB. The exceptions are elevated shots and break shots, where you might benefit from looking at the CB last. Our bodies get pretty good at delivering to the target we focus on.

If we're focused on the CB, where is the target? If we're focused on the CB, we may try to steer the cue as we hit. Much better to line up properly and stroke dead straight. If we're focused on the CB, we may tend to poke rather than stroke. What should we be looking at as we set up for the shot?

Get your eyes on the shot line while standing. Keep your eyes sharp on the OB or cushion target as you drop into your stance and shooting position. This idea of lining up to the more distant target not the CB will help you land more accurately. There are several ways to move your eyes during stroking. Slow down. See what you're seeing. In all cases, our eyes should be sharp down the target line before and during the hit stroke.

When you feel you are ready to shoot, bring your tip to a full stop at the back of the CB and look at it. For this tip position on the CB, for where your stick is pointed, and for the speed you have in mind, is it gonna work?

If so, take the shot. If not, back away and land it again. With over 3, pool cues, pool cue cases and billiards accessories, it's no wonder that PoolDawg is the pool player's best friend. We've helped over , pool and billiards players find the perfect pool cues and billiards accessories just for their game. Our staff is filled with people who actually play pool and our mission is to make sure that every one of our customers find the gear that will help take their game to the next level.

Do my eyes look at the cue ball or the ball being hit at time of stroking impact the shot in play. PoolDawg - The Pool Player's Best Friend With over 3, pool cues, pool cue cases and billiards accessories, it's no wonder that PoolDawg is the pool player's best friend.

Struggling To Be Confident In Your Snooker Aiming & Snooker Potting?

JavaScript seems to be disabled in your browser. You must have JavaScript enabled in your browser to utilize the functionality of this website. What should we be doing with our eyes as we shoot? The generally accepted wisdom here is that we should be looking at the object ball or rail target as we strike the CB.

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One of the things that is not mentioned too much when talking about the fundamentals of playing good pool is where to look. We have the cue ball, the pocket, the object ball and the location we want the cue ball to end up at to focus on. How do we organize our vision to make the most of what we are seeing? The first aspect of vision is for concentration. When we are playing pool seriously, keeping your eyes on the table at all times is the path to better concentration.

Applying spin to the cue ball

In the last two weeks we have looked at both your stance and how to bridge correctly to provide the stability needed for more accurate shots. Now we can expand upon that and look at the procedure for striking the ball. There are two parts to this, first you need to sight the ball correctly to ensure you form your stance in the right place, then you need to deliver the cue in a smooth and straight line to give yourself the best possible chance of playing the intended shot. To line up a ball you need to place your leading leg in line with the cue ball and the object ball. Once in this position it is important to sight the shot and assess the angles required to make it a reality before you get down on the table to play it. If you are not happy with your angles then begin this process again — never attempt to adjust the angle once already down and in position. Once you get down to the play the shot you should flick your eyes between the cue ball and object ball to re-assess the angles you have chosen prior to striking the white. You should then ensure you are looking at the object ball at the moment you strike the cue ball. This can be practiced by placing the white and blue in line with the centre pockets and then by potting the blue. Each time you pot the blue your cue action should be over the very centre of one of the middle pockets.

Snooker Coaching – Striking the Ball

Or perhaps you just fancy beating one of your cocky mates a little more than you currently do. The goal? To spread the balls out across the table and, preferably, pot one of them. You can then stay on the table and continue with your break. Fail to pot from the break and you allow your opponent in.

Mark Forums Read. Cue Ball last glance or Object Ball last glance?

The video above was something I started doing in the 90's. I posted this video five years ago that demonstrates perfectly how cueing is separate from potting.. The issue I see with a very high percentage of players who are struggling to get into regular 40 breaks, is that they are simply WAY too focused on 'potting the ball'. That is the purpose of snooker, right?!

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Mark Forums Read. Do you look at the cue ball or object ball when shooting? Status: Offline. Ok, I thought everyone looked at the object ball until tonight.

I was a high jumper in high school and college. Not a good one. Before I started competing I scissored about 5 feet. Com'on I was a kid for crying out loud. When I joined the high school track team in the coach made me learn the "western roll", and in college I was taught the "belly roll".

Become A Pool Genius By Mastering These 6 Essential Shots

Click here to design your USA Pool. Of course striking the cue ball between these positions will give you a greater variation but this will be discussed later in this article. You should also remember that the power you apply to the shot will affect the amount of spin you manage to achieve hence the need to practice so that you can strike the ball confidently and get the right result. The next sections below will describe the different spins and the effect that they will have on the cue ball. Top spin occurs when you apply the cue tip above the centre spot of the cue ball. The higher the strike the more top spin that is applied. The mechanics of this works as you are applying more forward spin that with a straight shot thus causing the cue ball to travel further along the pool cloth after the shot rather than slowing down immediately.

Oct 24, - Do you look at the cue ball or object ball when shooting? Do you look at the ball when you shoot? Vision: What to Look When You're Playing Pool.

You're welcome to join our Facebook group: Snooker. All you have to do now is pot balls! Knowing how to pot a ball is something you either have or you do not have. Of course practice can help but you really need an eye for it. When walking to the table after your opponent has missed it seems he has left you an easy pot on a straight red followed by an easier black.

How to Play Snooker

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What Do We Look At? – A Pool Odyssey with Mark Finkelstein

George Moyle is seventy years old and still playing tournaments locally. I have also played in a nine-ball tournament in Lincoln City, Oregon, where there were two hundred players in my bracket. I was one match from the finals when I was beaten.

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Comments: 5
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  2. Doukora

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  3. Vudosida

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  4. Shaktikasa

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  5. Jusar

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